May 24, 2014
david-f-locke:

“as soon as you know you are in prison, you have a possibility to escape.”
William S Burroughs

david-f-locke:

“as soon as you know you are in prison, you have a possibility to escape.”

William S Burroughs

(via beatbopped)

9:32am
  
Filed under: William S Burroughs 
May 22, 2014
5to1:

Kim Gordon , Michael Stipe & William S Burroughs

5to1:

Kim Gordon , Michael Stipe & William S Burroughs

May 22, 2014
Allen Ginsberg at a demonstration in San Francisco, Oct. 1963.
Sign reads, ”War is black magic / Belly flowers to North and South Vietnam / include everybody / End the human war / Name hypnosis and fear is the / Enemy—Satan go home! / I accept America and Red China / To the human race / Madame Nhu and Mao Tse-Tung / Are in the same boat of meat.”

Allen Ginsberg at a demonstration in San Francisco, Oct. 1963.

Sign reads, ”War is black magic / Belly flowers to North and South Vietnam / include everybody / End the human war / Name hypnosis and fear is the / Enemy—Satan go home! / I accept America and Red China / To the human race / Madame Nhu and Mao Tse-Tung / Are in the same boat of meat.”

May 22, 2014

ginzyblog:

"I dreamed I dwelled in a homeless place/ Where I was lost alone/ Folk looked right through me into space/And passed with eyes of stone.." Allen Ginsberg’s "New Stanzas for Amazing Grace", an up-dated revisioning of an old song, was composed (in April 1994) at the request of Ed Sanders for his innovative project,  ”The New Amazing Grace” (new lyrics, old melody), and was performed, in November of that year, as part of an all-star gathering at the Poetry Project (St Mark’s Church) in New York.

below (courtesy of the soundtrack of the indispensible Jerry Aronson’s Life and Times of Allen Ginsberg DVD) is Paul Simon, giving his tasteful version (of Allen’s poem).

The history and the story behind the original song is all pretty fascinating. Watch a short documentary about it here - or, for a shorter version, seehere.

May 22, 2014

jackkerrouac:

beat-kusagi:

J. Kerouac

Kerouac At McDarrah’s Apartment

American author and poet Jack Kerouac (1922 - 1969) contemplates a poem at the apartment (304 W. 14th St.) of photographer McDarrah and his soon-to-be wife, Gloria, New York, New York, December 10, 1959. The poem, written by Kerouac, along with other guests Albert Saijo and Lew Welch, was entitled ‘This is a Poem by Albert Saijo, Lew Welch, and Jack Kerouac’ (later published as ‘Trip Trap’), and was based on the trio’s journey from San Francisco to New York in Welch’s car. 

(via derrierelasalledebains)

9:44am
  
Filed under: Jack Kerouac 
May 22, 2014
netlex:

“The price an artist pays for doing what he wants is that he has to do it.” William S. Burroughs on creativity

netlex:

“The price an artist pays for doing what he wants is that he has to do it.”
William S. Burroughs on creativity

(Source: theguardian.com, via jackkerrouac)

9:43am
  
Filed under: William S Burroughs 
May 22, 2014
"I did no think I was hooked on him like this. The withdrawl symptoms are worse than the Marker habit. Tell Allen I plead guilty to vampirism and other crimes against life. But I love him and nothing else cancels love"

William Burroughs to Jack Kerouac speaking of Allen Ginsberg (April 1954)

(Source: wedieunbloomed, via jackkerrouac)

May 22, 2014
mpdrolet:

Self-portrait, 1985
Allen Ginsberg

mpdrolet:

Self-portrait, 1985

Allen Ginsberg

9:36am
  
Filed under: Allen Ginsberg 
May 22, 2014
"Realize, Allen, that if all the world were green, there would be no such thing as the color green. Similarly, men cannot know what it is to be together without otherwise knowing what it is to be apart. If all the world were love, then, how could love exist? This is why we turn away from each other on moments of great happiness and closeness. How can we know happiness and closeness without contrasting them, like lights?"

— Kerouac to Ginsberg, September, 1948

via jackkerouac

(via keroassady)

May 22, 2014
Wavy Gravy with Allen Ginsburg in 1988 – photo by Bob Minkin

Wavy Gravy with Allen Ginsburg in 1988 – photo by Bob Minkin

May 11, 2014
jackkerrouac:

ladysnowgoat:

This book is making me have wayyyyyy too many emotions about Ginsberg’s response to Kerouac’s death and their friendship.

This was Allen Ginsberg,” Gordon Ball declares after recounting intimate moments with the cultural icon and beloved Beat Generation poet on East Hill Farm, outside Cherry Valley, New York.During the late 1960s, when peace, drugs, and free love were direct challenges to conventional society, Allen Ginsberg, treasurer of Committee on Poetry, Inc., funded what he hoped was “a haven for comrades in distress” in rural upstate New York. First described as an uninspiring, dilapidated four-bedroom house with acres of untended land, including the graves of its first residents, East Hill Farm became home to those who sought pastoral enlightenment in the presence of Ginsberg’s brilliance and generosity.A self-declared member of a “ragtag group of urban castoffs” including Gregory Corso, Peter Orlovsky, Herbert Huncke, and the mythic Barbara Rubin, farm manager Ball tends to a non-stop flurry of guests, chores, and emotional outbursts while also making time to sit quietly with Ginsberg and discuss poetry, Kerouac, sex, and America’s war in Vietnam. In honest and vivid prose, Ball offers a rare intimate glimpse of the poetic pillar of the Beat Generation as a striving and accessible human being at home on the farm and in the world. 

jackkerrouac:

ladysnowgoat:

This book is making me have wayyyyyy too many emotions about Ginsberg’s response to Kerouac’s death and their friendship.

This was Allen Ginsberg,” Gordon Ball declares after recounting intimate moments with the cultural icon and beloved Beat Generation poet on East Hill Farm, outside Cherry Valley, New York.

During the late 1960s, when peace, drugs, and free love were direct challenges to conventional society, Allen Ginsberg, treasurer of Committee on Poetry, Inc., funded what he hoped was “a haven for comrades in distress” in rural upstate New York. First described as an uninspiring, dilapidated four-bedroom house with acres of untended land, including the graves of its first residents, East Hill Farm became home to those who sought pastoral enlightenment in the presence of Ginsberg’s brilliance and generosity.

A self-declared member of a “ragtag group of urban castoffs” including Gregory Corso, Peter Orlovsky, Herbert Huncke, and the mythic Barbara Rubin, farm manager Ball tends to a non-stop flurry of guests, chores, and emotional outbursts while also making time to sit quietly with Ginsberg and discuss poetry, Kerouac, sex, and America’s war in Vietnam. In honest and vivid prose, Ball offers a rare intimate glimpse of the poetic pillar of the Beat Generation as a striving and accessible human being at home on the farm and in the world. 

May 11, 2014
vagabondbohemia:

William S. Burroughs

vagabondbohemia:

William S. Burroughs

(via jackkerrouac)

6:22pm
  
Filed under: William S Burroughs 
May 11, 2014

Postcard from Allen Ginsberg to Mike Hendrick, April 29, 1976

Transcription:April 29, 76
POB582 Stuyvesant Sta.
N.Y.10009 N.Y.

Dear M.H.
1.) Poetry is what you, or anyone, writes, not a definition which limits activity to an “idea” of what it should be. (There’s something dopey about your definitions anyway. Fuck you.) (Afterthought)
2.) Any conscious goal, by eliminating irrational unconscious information, & data, fucks up the creation of poetry. You discover it, you don’t figure it out in advance. ‘can’t plan genius.’
3.) To talk to your private self is the way to talk to all self. Personal is universal simultaneously.
4.) Your questions are all fucked up and irrelevant. Your (our) problem as poets is to write truth as we recognize it, not worry about our egos being recognized – or our poems – you asked, I answered – Allen Ginsberg

Poem on the post card’s reverse side:

“Returning to the Country for a Brief Visit” 

Old-one the dog stretches stiff-legged,
Soon he’ll be underground.  Spring’s first fat bee
Buzzes yellow over new grass and dead leaves.
What’s this little brown insect walking zigzag
Over the sunny white page of Su Tung-P’O’s poem?
Fly away, tiny mite, even your life is tender - 
I lift the book and blow you into the dazzling void.

Allen Ginsberg   4/20/73



May 7, 2014
paper-rum-hemingway:

Man Ray, Peter Orlovsky and Allen Ginsberg. this was probably an interesting conversation.

paper-rum-hemingway:

Man Ray, Peter Orlovsky and Allen Ginsberg. this was probably an interesting conversation.

(via jackkerrouac)

May 7, 2014
Kurt Vonnegut, Jill Krementz, Sting, and Allen Ginsberg

Kurt Vonnegut, Jill Krementz, Sting, and Allen Ginsberg

(Source: namelesshere)